From SEC to SGA

On Friday April 12th, TSU President Glenda Glover announced the Student Government Association winners in TSU’s amphitheater. Amongst those winners was Devonte Johnson who received more votes than his opponent candidate Missmollie Thomas. After the announcements Devonte Johnson began walking amongst the crowd, thanking them for their support. In an interview, the TSU SGA President-elect said, “TSU has definitely molded me for the better.” He went on to say he decided to continue coming to TSU ,and not transfer, because of the support he receives from his peers.

One of his peers ,Demetrik Lewis, recalled a story with Devonte Johnson in an interview, saying, “we didn’t have a ride to get to Louisville, but he didn’t give up… he found a way.” Another peer of the President-elect, who is also in Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity inc. said in an interview that, “he’s been in the follower role and he knows what that takes, now he’s in a leadership roll, and I believe he knows what it takes to lead.

Devonte Johnson, if he passes post certification, will serve as student government association president during the next school year beginning in the fall. He says he will use his influence with his peers to help him lead.

For the video version of the story click here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RItg-6bKv0I&list=UUq5m4L95rRQAI_8tSbiI6YQ&index=1

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TSU is Seeing Stars

As of last year students, who come to Tennessee State University now have an option to minor in astronomy. A department that was responsible for finding one of the first 15 neighboring solar systems in our galaxy back in 1999. Since this option has become available, students have begun to take advantage of this minor. One in particular is Avonte Harris, a TSU sophomore. In an interview, he claimed he decided to minor in astronomy because, “he’s always been fascinated by the stars.” He went on to say that he always used to watch the discovery channel when he was at home.

Avonte is one of many students that hope to work with TSU’s astronomer Gregory Henry, who helps analyze the findings of TSU’s space telescopes located in Southern Arizona. Henry was part of the team that found one of the first 15 neighboring solar systems in our galaxy, and is happy to work with students interested in astronomy. And though the U.S. government has set up a satellite system since TSU’s discovery in 1999 that has been finding solar systems by the hundreds, astronomers still consider it a landmark discovery.

Because of this reason, TSU is now considering making astronomy available to students as a major. Avonte Harris is one of the several students taking astronomy classes that hopes this study becomes a major. He claims that it is, “pretty cool to go to a school that made a landmark discovery in astronomy”, and hopes to continue his studies of the stars whether it be as a major or a minor.

For the video version of the story, click here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1WSwBx8UbY&list=UUq5m4L95rRQAI_8tSbiI6YQ&index=1